Introduction


The purpose of this quest is to improve skills in interpreting exhibits in industrial heritage sites Interpretive exhibits don't just display objects; they use objects to teach history. They do more than just name the objects or group them or even show their functions. Interpretive exhibits use objects to help us understand and explain community history. Good interpretive exhibits present sequences, study effects, explain relationships, make comparisons, and raise as well as answer questions.

Task


Task 1. Before your visit

Identify a person from your heritage site visit.

Find out more about someone who was working there 100 years ago.

Research: Can you find their name, what they worked with and a little about them personally. Ask the curator, the museum educator or the archivist.

Presume that a person from 100 years ago came back to life. That person would know nothing of our modern world. He or she would need to learn about all the technology we take for granted.

Your first task is to prepare an action plan to explain everyday technology such as mobile phones and tablets to that person

Task 2. At the Heritage site

Have a look around the heritage site or museum and read the texts. Can you easily understand them? Are they too easy or too complicated? Simply naming an object or an artefact does little to interpret either the object or the past. Displaying groups of similar objects is only slightly more interpretive. However explaining or showing what the object does is a way to begin interpretation.

Work in groups of four and choose an artefact or group of items from the display or site and prepare an interpretation for the other members of your class.

Task 3. Interpreting the buildings. Answer the questions in the Reading Buildings document.

Task 4. make a photo documentation of the words and concepts in the " A Place is a Space with Feelings 2 document

Process


Before your visit find out

Research: Why was the site chosen? Local geology, physical geography, local climate, access to markets, tradition - was the industry well established in the area? Labour supply, degree of isolation (industries producing noxious fumes might be forced to set up away from towns).
Were there more buildings on site than are present now? What machinery was originally used? Has there been a change of use or alteration?

What raw materials were needed? Where might these have come from? If from any distance, how were they transported? Did the industrial process need anything else, such as water supply or drying space? What happened to any waste products?
If fuel was needed, how did it reach the site?

Where were the products sold? How were they transported there?

Identify a person from your heritage site visit. Find out more about someone who was working there between 50 to 100 years ago.

Research: Can you find their name, what they worked with and a little about them personally. Ask the curator, the museum educator or the archivist.

Presume that a person from 100 years ago came back to life. That person would know nothing of our modern world. He or she would need to learn about all the technology we take for granted.

Task: A mobile telephone or tablets are pieces of technology that didn’t exist 100 years ago, but you now use them every day. A mobile telephone or tablet delivers audio messages, pictures and videos. 100 years ago this type of communication would not be available. What type of communication technology existed 100 years ago

Prepare a plan of action to present a mobile telephone or tablet to the person from the past. Remember that they would know little, if anything about the equipment so you will have to begin from the beginning and make the description very clear and easy to understand. Take nothing for granted! Showing the mobile device in relationship to other communications breakthroughs achieved an additional interpretive step. Finally, discussing the effects of the mobile communications on people’s lives made the historical significance of mobile devices more understandable and specific.

At the heritage site

Look around at the buildings. Folow the questions in the document "Reading Buildings" and "Space Place". Try to make a phot documentation of each word or phrase in the exercise book. make a presentation of how you think the building worked for making things and what it would have been like to work there.Where is the site? What are the surroundings like? What transport facilities are there - road, rail, canal? Is there evidence of transport facilities no longer used? What buildings or other structures are on the site? Is it possible to determine what each was used for from its design or contents? Is any machinery present? Is there evidence for the existence of machinery? Is there evidence of alteration or extension? Do some parts seem to be of different dates? If so, which are, likely to be earlier, which later? Is there any evidence of a change of use? How were materials or products moved from one process to the next? Are there any traces of waste heaps? What was the power source? Was there more than one? If so is one earlier than another? Were there any structures used for storage or administration? Is there evidence of a despatch point for the finished products? Is there evidence for the means of transport? How many workers would have been on site? Where might they have lived? How might they have got to work? What building materials have been used? Is there any special reason for the choice of materials? Do they differ from the materials used for other buildings nearby? Is this building connected to any other complex in the area?

Task: Have a look around the heritage site or museum and read the texts. Can you easily understand them? Are they too easy or too complicated? Simply naming an object or an artefact does little to interpret either the object or the past. Displaying groups of similar objects is only slightly more interpretive. However explaining or showing what the object does is a way to begin interpretation.

Work in groups of four and choose an item or group of items from the display or site and prepare an interpretation for the other members of your class.

You are making an interpretation, not just reading the facts and figures found in the display tests. Don’t be afraid to make the story interesting to your classmates: Choose a tone, comic, serious, light-hearted or expert. If you don’t find a fact or an answer in the display don’t be afraid to make an intelligent guess or an interpretation based upon what you do know, previous experience etc.

Each group in then will present their interpretation to the other groups. In this way the whole class has interpreted the heritage site for each other.

Learning Outcomes

  • To investigate industrial sites in their locality and via activities, case studies and resources to look at the many ways in which industrial heritage can be used for inspiration across the curriculum.

Knowledge acquired

  • To encopurage learners to make their own interpretation of a heritage site.

Skills acquired

  • To gain an understanding of the form and function of industrial structures and processes

Competences acquired

  • To make an individual interpretation of a local industrial heritage site and then create a "heritage trail" for classmates to follow.

Conclusion

Links

Videos


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